2 days ago   •   146 notes   •   VIA irant-rpc   •   SOURCE shackleboltrps

Scheduling days off for admins

shackleboltrps:

For those who’ve been an admin for a roleplay know that it’s not an easy task. In fact, it can be very stressful, especially if you have no experience balancing your admin duties, your characters and real life. From the get go, you become very concerned about how the roleplay looks, the number messages and applications that need to be looked at in your inbox, the number of promos on your queue blog, and a growing list of other things. Without even realizing it, you’re spending 90% of your time on admin duties. After spending so much time on the main blog, you’re more likely tired and have no time and/or energy for actual roleplaying. 

Perhaps this comes from the mentality that you have to go hard when you open your roleplay. You have to promote your roleplay constantly. In all, you always have to be online, available and always producing new biographies, plot drops, and events. It can be easy to burn out and have no energy to keep up your roleplay. No one can constantly be available to answer questions and produce new biographies for long periods of time. This is why, I suggest admins to schedule days off for admin duties. As I’ve pointed out earlier, doing so might

  • give you time off to relax from running a roleplay
  • give you more time to roleplay on your character blogs
  • help you get on the main and be productive for short period of times on specific days instead of trying to be productive all the time

Of course, this sounds nice for admins but can is it something that can really be done? As an admin, you become worrisome and attached to making things go as smoothly as possible. Believe it or not, you can still be productive and on top of things even if you take time off from admin duties. Under the cut, you’ll find some tips that can help with that. 

Read More

2 days ago   •   90 notes   •   VIA towriteandroleplay   •   SOURCE chnspine

byeeleven:

(half of the gif is black and white because tumblr sucks)

THEME NUMERO 11 → by jensenaackles (temporarily byeeleven)

live preview | code

features/notes:

  • four extra links
  • visible tags
  • top banner image (preview image is 700 x 250)
  • blog’s icon
  • reblog button
  • choice of having a white or black audio post play button (DON’T HAVE BOTH OPTIONS ON AT THE SAME TIME)

Rules:

  • Please don’t remove the credit or move it to another page.
  • Please don’t steal as your own or use it as a base.
  • Edit it to your heart’s content- just don’t claim as your own.

Please keep to my requests- and liking/reblogging is awesome

Thanks so much, feel free to contact for any help.

2 days ago   •   370 notes   •   VIA hermajestyhelps   •   SOURCE fictionwritingtips

What Good Stories Have in Common

fictionwritingtips:

It’s hard to stay what makes a story good because there’s no standard formula to follow, but you can pinpoint some similar elements that make most stories effective.  Stories can be a great for a number of reasons, but sometimes it all boils down to basic elements that can be expanded upon depending on your story. If you’re struggling with how to improve your story, check out some of these suggestions:

Inject emotion.

Your story is nothing without emotion. We all feel something on a daily basis and so should your characters. Good storytelling needs emotion, which might require us to expose ourselves to the world in a way that we wouldn’t normally do. If you’re not emotional about your characters, your readers won’t be either. Get to the heart of every scene and pinpoint what emotion (or lack of emotion) is driving your characters forward.

Simplify it.

Simple stories are often the best stories. Don’t overcomplicate your plot because you think it will make your story more interesting. Cut out scenes that are unnecessary. Focus on the stuff that explains something about your world or characters. Sometimes getting rid of the excess will make your story great and help tighten the narrative.

Tell the truth.

Good storytelling requires you to tell the truth about your characters and human nature. It’s important you stay true to the world you’ve created and you don’t stray from its reality. If you keep adding to the possibilities of your world without foreshadowing them in some way, or you’re not honest with your readers, they will get frustrated and feel cheated. Stay true to the development of your characters and let them grow.

Keep it realistic and relatable.

In order to keep your story realistic and relatable, you need to understand your world and characters. Give your characters flaws, let them fail, and allow them to pick themselves back up again. Your readers will relate to characters that don’t get everything right all the time. We relate to characters that fail and learn from their failure. We relate to characters that grow. Focusing on character development is the key to good storytelling and it could help fix many of your storytelling problems.

-Kris Noel

2 days ago   •   1,539 notes   •   VIA slitheringink   •   SOURCE slitheringink

Writing Character Voice

slitheringink:

It’s not always what you say…

But also how you say it that defines how a character sounds. Like all things in writing, understanding and executing character voice involves a lot of mistakes and a lot practice. Out of all of the skills you can have as an author, it’s one of the most difficult to do well because, sometimes, it’s hard to make characters not all sound the same. So how do you differentiate? What are the things you need to consider when finding your character’s voice?

Know Your Character – Personality

Assuming you’ve done a fair amount of development on your character beforehand, you should know what kind of person they are, and what kind of person they will become throughout the course of your story. People can be any number of things, and have any number of traits, often shaped by their life experiences, the environment around them, the society they’re a part of, and the choices they’ve made during their lives. People can be kind, loving souls, they can be uncaring, they can be rude, and they can be downright evil. All of these things may be reflected in their speech.

In order to determine how a character may speak, ask yourself these questions:

  1. Who is your character talking to?
  2. Why is your character talking to that person?
  3. What are your character’s goals? What would your character do to accomplish those goals?
  4. Is your character being truthful when they’re speaking, or are they masking an ulterior motive?
  5. Do their life experiences come across in their speech? Has a tragedy affected them? Has a positive event? Does their sorrow come across through in words, or do they hide it by faking another emotion? Are they sarcastic?
  6. Do they like speaking? Are they an extrovert? An introvert? Are they being forced to speak?
  7. Do they have a mental illness that may cause them to become withdrawn or affect another aspect of their behavior?

Know Your Character – Target

Relationships will often determine how a character speaks.

Ask yourself: who are they speaking to? Some people have no trouble speaking to anyone, even a random stranger, while for others speaking to anyone at all is very difficult. Even people who aren’t very social usually have someone they can talk to, someone they can trust. Who does your character trust? Why?

People tend to talk to close friends and family differently than they would anyone else. They tell people they’re close to their deepest secrets, their most personal flaws, and their greatest apprehensions. They may also act differently around people they trust, losing any fear that they may be judged for what they do and are free to be who they are, which they may hide from the rest of the world, for whatever reason. People who haven’t earned your character’s trust may be avoided, and when questioned your character may withhold information from them.

When speaking to a person in a position of authority, like a police officer or that character’s boss, one would generally assume that those people would be treated with respect. Of course, there are those who dislike authority of all kinds and seek to rebel against it. They may say things that get them into trouble as a result.

Know Your Character – Origin and Education

Where is your character from? What kind of education did your character receive? Cultural influences may shape your character’s beliefs, which may affect what they choose to express in their speech.

Consider:

  1. What culture did they come from? What religion do they practice, if they practice? What beliefs does your character ascribe to? Do they live by the values of their culture or religion? Have they adopted a different culture or religion than the one they grew up with?
  2. Do their beliefs dictate their behavior?
  3. Are there certain aspects of their culture, of their native language, that slips into their speech?
  4. Did their country of origin somehow limit their education? Did your character grow up with free access to information? Did your character grow up in a place with censorship?
  5. Did your character have a traditional education? Were they tutored? Were they in a public school environment? Private school?
  6. Does your character like to learn? Is your character book smart? Is your character street smart?
  7. What level of education did they receive? High school? College? Trade school? Something else?

Everyone has a different level of education, and a person’s experience with language will usually influence how they form sentences and what words they decide to use. An individual with a high school education would likely speak differently than someone who’s been through college. Education also tends to have an influence on language style and whether or not someone tends to speak formally or conversationally. Of course, there are always exceptions to this. There are some incredibly well-spoken people who don’t hold degrees just as there are some terrible speakers who do.

Another thing to consider is that people who like to read, whether they’ve grown up with it or it’s something they enjoy later in life, tend to have a good understanding of language and speech patterns. Reading is a thinking process, involving more than just looking at words on a page. There’s comprehension involved, and people who read are often complex thinkers. Complex thought may translate to complex speech, but sometimes putting ideas to words is difficult, no matter what level of education a person may have.

Putting it on Paper

You should have a good idea of what causes characters to say what they say, but you’re still unsure of how to actually write it.

Let’s take a look at Kerrigore, one of the main characters in my novel. To give a little background he’s been alive for quite a while, has been screwed over by people he’s trusted many times, is generally a grump, and tends to hide behind snark and sarcasm. As such, a lot of his speech is expressed in short sentences, and though he’s certainly intelligent enough to use complex sentence structures, he doesn’t usually. It’s too much effort, though he slips when he’s irritated. He also swears a lot and tends to be impersonal to people he doesn’t know well.

In this scene, he’s talking to Kaelus, someone he’s known for a very long time, and while he doesn’t necessarily dislike her, he dislikes who she serves and what she stands for.

“What are you doing here?” he asked, kneeling down to see what had become of his wine. It had spilled out onto the kitchen floor and seeped under the fridge, bottle neck in scattered pieces. The bottom of the bottle was still intact and he picked it up, drinking the measly sip that was left and shaking it out with a frown. “Wait, never mind, you don’t do anything on your own,” Kerrigore paused to glare up at her, “What does father want?”

“For you to return home. That never changes,” she said.

“Neither does my answer.” Kerrigore gathered broken glass in his palm. Silence hung between them. He dumped the glass in the trash and tossed a dish towel on the wine, wiping it back and forth with his foot. “Like Nathriel, father can go fuck himself.”

“This grudge you hold, it destroys more than you realize,” she frowned.”

Even from that small snippet you can get a sense of character voice difference between the two of them. It’s not only accentuated by what they say, but also by their mannerisms and actions. Body language can help reveal a character’s voice as well. Irritation is clear with Kerrigore not only due to what he says, but by the fact that he’s not looking at Kaelus when he’s speaking. He’s busy cleaning up his spilled wine, allowing that to take precedent over being polite.

When writing voice, you also must be mindful of the tone of a scene. Though people may react to the same stimuli in a different manner, there is an expectation of how normal people (or what a society perceives to be normal) react under certain circumstances. For instance, most people will react to seeing a dead body with shock, and then probably remorse or at least respect for the dead. A person with more experience, a police officer or coroner for example, may still feel some form of remorse but the shock of seeing a dead human being probably isn’t there. Repetition may dull reactions but you’re going to want the character’s dialogue to reflect the serious tone of the scene.

One thing to note with tone: there are always exceptions. If it’s part of a character’s personality, tone can be intentionally broken. Just be sure the reasoning is solid.

Atypical Speech and Complex Words

Some characters use different syntax in speech. Yoda from Star Wars is a solid example of a character that uses different syntax to create a unique speech pattern. Sometimes it’s inconsistent, and sometimes it’s in an object-subject-verb order. For example: “Brave you are.” Language is always fun to play with, so don’t be afraid to experiment with word order if it would suit your character.

For Reference:

For some characters, more complicated is better. The best example I have is Sheldon from Big Bang Theory. He uses some incredibly complex words and sentence structures to express simple concepts in order for the writers to show the audience that he’s an intelligent character. He also tends to infuse his conversations with knowledge from areas of study like: physics, chemistry, calculus, differential equations, engineering, etc.

While complex words can serve to show intelligence (or lack of if used incorrectly), they can also express a more precise meaning for a concept. In addition, they may also make a character come off as arrogant. While the general rule with complex words is to leave them out and use something simpler so you don’t confuse readers, if it works for a character and fits with their voice, then do it.

For example: “I’m disinclined to acquiesce to your request. Means no.” – Captain Barbosa, Pirates of the Caribbean.

Complex Words with Simple Meanings:

  • Defenestrate  – throwing something out a window.
  • Extirpate – destroy completely.
  • Disambiguate – to explain.
  • Antediluvian – old.
  • Pulchritudinous – breathtakingly beautiful.
  • Ameliorate – improve.

The TV Trope Spock Speak covers a lot of this well.

With speech, a lot of things you’ve heard as “rules” can be thrown out in order to create a suitable voice for a character.

In dialogue it’s okay to:

  • Not use contractions. This is often used to convey an intelligent or formal speaking character.
  • Use sentence fragments. If you sit around and listen to people actually converse, a lot of them don’t bother to talk in complete sentences, especially when talking to friends. Part of this is because someone you know, often knows what you mean, even if you don’t convey it completely.
  • Use slang, euphemisms, and colloquialisms.
  • Use catch words or phrases. Some people tend to use a certain word or phrase when they talk. That’s perfectly fine to shape a unique voice, but don’t overdo it or it may fall into cliché territory.
  • Use the passive voice. While generally a no-no in a narrative, passive voice is perfectly fine to use in speech. Example: “I did it” (active voice) vs. “It is done” (passive voice).

Accents and Non-English Speakers

Do not be afraid to state what kind of accent your character has. Consider country of origin, if it’s a light or thick accent, and if it’s hard or easy to understand. Count on the intelligence of your reader to recognize accents. Most people can imagine the sounds of accents like: English, French, Italian, or German if you mention it in the text. Granted, they are some of the most commonly used and sometimes stereotypically portrayed in media where people draw from, but the mental association with the sounds is there nonetheless. Uncommon accents or dialects that may not be so easy to infer might require extra description.

Again, it’s absolutely okay to say “he spoke with a thick German accent” and let the reader fill in the rest.

My opinion about the phonetic spelling of words to represent an accent comes from research and from doing such things myself when I was a beginner. For example: using words like ‘vhat’ or ‘vat’ instead of ‘what’ for a German accent. It’s annoying to read phonetics as an English speaker, and for the language being represented, it’s annoying to the native speaker to be represented in that manner. Phonetics is generally something to avoid when writing accents, even if you’ve seen it before in published books.

What about something like ebonics or a specific non-English dialect? My advice stands, as phonetic representation can sometimes come off as unintended racism especially when it’s being written from a non-native speaker perspective. This kind of thing can happen with any representation of a language that isn’t your own of course, and it’s important to be mindful of that fact.

As with any accurate portrayal, research and speaking to the people you wish to represent is key. Getting their perspective is important and the fear of misrepresentation shouldn’t stop you from including diverse characters.

That being said you can represent a non-native speaker in reasonable ways:

  • I know this isn’t normally the case in the United States, but in some other countries English is often taught as a second language at an early age. When representing a character speaking English as a second language, it’s important to consider how long that character has been speaking English. If it hasn’t been a long time, it would be reasonable to say that the character may slip back into his native language when speaking English becomes difficult (I’ve seen it happen here with Spanish speakers, especially kids who were born in other countries). Again, there are a lot of non-native English speakers who are perfectly proficient at the language, and even speak it better than natives. Do not fall into the stereotypical trap that non-native speakers “can’t handle English” or that their language is somehow inferior.
  • Emotion can play a role. Sometimes people will slip into their native languages when they are angry or distressed. Others will do it when they want to communicate something to another native speaker, and hide their words from a non-native.
  • It’s also important to consider the syntax of the native language. Sometimes native syntax will slip into English speech.
  • On that same token, sometimes native words or phrases will be used in place of English ones, especially if they’re commonly used in the character’s everyday life. For example, the character could have a relative that doesn’t speak English so he has to go back and forth between both languages.
  • Culture also plays a role. Different cultures have different perspectives of the world and how people should act. It is best to read articles written by natives or people who have lived in different parts of the world to get a different perspective.
  • Sometimes, even within the same language, there are differences. Using the United States and England for example, we both speak English but have different words for the same things. For example: we say trash in the US while rubbish is mostly commonly used in England.

Conveying Tone of Voice

I know people harp on “show, don’t tell”, but if you have the opportunity to attribute a sound or tone adjective to a character’s voice, do it. There’s nothing wrong with letting the reader in on what a character sounds like, especially when that character is first introduced or says something important that’s thematically appropriate to the tone of the scene.

Tone of voice and scene tone can go hand in hand to enhance each other, but know they are different concepts.

In order to convey tone, you can do one of these things:

  1. Use an adjective.
  2. Use a comparison to relate the sound of the character’s voice to one that’s easier for people to imagine.
  3. Relate the character’s voice to a living person, if applicable.

For words to describe tone, I offer this link from the Writing Helper’s Tumblr: 55 Words to Describe Someone’s Voice.

Happy writing!

-Morgan

5 days ago   •   3 notes

Saving liveshunting things. It’s a life-long business.

The Usual Suspects is an original character roleplay, based off the popular television series Supernatural. While utilizing elements that appear in popular fiction, as well as folklore from the televisions show, we hope to provide a free roam environment for the players. Through the usage of skeleton biographies, applicants will have a better grasp of their character’s stories, and be able to better develop their own plotlines. Instead of establishing a solid and overlaying plot, the admins encourage players to create their own stories amongst themselves with the help of occasional story drops. The Usual Suspects is meant to be more than your typical roleplay, it is meant to be a community amongst aspiring writers and fans.

| HOME | FAQ & ASK | SUMMARY | CHARACTER INDEXAPPLICATION |
1 week ago   •   246 notes   •   VIA theme-hunter   •   SOURCE nutty-themes
nutty-themes:

XXXII - The Extreme

- Live Preview: Basic Layout (One Column) • Grid Layout • With Sidebar Layout - Download  - Last Update: 13 April 2013  - Help: Installing • Customizing • FAQ



About
So this is basically the theme I have right now on this blog. Overall it’s very simple and though I’ve only included four links, depending on what layout you have, there is enough space to add more. As always if you come across any coding errors please tell me.



Features
There are three different layouts to choose from: Basic (one column), Grid and With Sidebar.
Header image with no set dimensions
Extra text boxes in sidebar for additional information.
All post types supported.
Space for four custom links, page link disabled.
A full list of features and options are listed in the live preview.

nutty-themes:

XXXII - The Extreme

- Live Preview: Basic Layout (One Column)Grid LayoutWith Sidebar Layout
- Download
- Last Update: 13 April 2013 
- Help: InstallingCustomizingFAQ

About

So this is basically the theme I have right now on this blog. Overall it’s very simple and though I’ve only included four links, depending on what layout you have, there is enough space to add more. As always if you come across any coding errors please tell me.

Features

  • There are three different layouts to choose from: Basic (one column), Grid and With Sidebar.
  • Header image with no set dimensions
  • Extra text boxes in sidebar for additional information.
  • All post types supported.
  • Space for four custom links, page link disabled.
  • A full list of features and options are listed in the live preview.
cation-codes:

THEME 008: REIGNpreview // download 
Tumblr user hungerfire requested that the cation-codes theme be released, so here it is! I hope you enjoy this theme and all of the options I have added to it to ensure that you guys are able to customize it to the fullest.
The main navigation only appears on the index page, permalink and tag pages will only have a small navigation bar that shows up on the index page once you scroll past the banner. 
The first four links for the main navigation will be the links that appear on the navigation bar. 
Font family and font size are customizable, I have also taken the liberty of adding in the optional update box. There are seven custom links and a subtitle, as well as an optional sidebar image. 

cation-codes:

THEME 008: REIGN
preview // download 

Tumblr user hungerfire requested that the cation-codes theme be released, so here it is! I hope you enjoy this theme and all of the options I have added to it to ensure that you guys are able to customize it to the fullest.

The main navigation only appears on the index page, permalink and tag pages will only have a small navigation bar that shows up on the index page once you scroll past the banner. 

The first four links for the main navigation will be the links that appear on the navigation bar. 

Font family and font size are customizable, I have also taken the liberty of adding in the optional update box. There are seven custom links and a subtitle, as well as an optional sidebar image. 

3 months ago   •   6 notes

Can we please stop posting our follow/unfollow links and app count updated announcements in actor tags, thank.

4 months ago   •   17 notes   •   VIA treadsoftly-rpg   •   SOURCE treadsoftly-rpg
treadsoftly-rpg:

It is raining. You’re looking for shelter when your eyes alight on a familiar sight: the doorman of the speakeasy, one of Francesca’s joints, looking as gruff and generally disagreeable as ever, his eyes scanning the street for potential threats. As his eyes alight on you, you know you’re one of said threats.
Striding up to the man and blinking the rainwater from your eyes, you offer him a smile and wait for his verdict. His eyes take you in, scanning your person once, twice, before alighting on your face. Then, after a tense moment of waiting, he says the word you’ve been waiting for: “password?”
The phrase you speak is right, of course. You cough a little as you enter, your lungs protesting the heavy smoke permeating the air. It is the same group of Chicago nightlife you remember, lined wall-to-wall with the rich and the ragged and the reckless, of which all are now looking at you. Your neck heats up under their gaze as you walk to the bar, sitting down on a barstool before anyone can protest your arrival.
“What can I get you?” The bartender’s voice is tinged with disapproval.
“Whiskey,” you say simply, turning to the flapper dame who is currently batting her eyelashes at you.
The date is June 7th, 1925, and as the scent of gasoline hits your nostrils, you realize that you are gonna have a very long night.
—
Tread Softly is a mature roleplay set in Prohibition-Era Chicago. There’s going to be violence, sex, and lots and lots of drama, so if that appeals come on in! If not, however, we’ll be sad to see you go, but it’s for the best!
—
Home | Plot | Characters | Faceclaims | Rules 

treadsoftly-rpg:

It is raining. You’re looking for shelter when your eyes alight on a familiar sight: the doorman of the speakeasy, one of Francesca’s joints, looking as gruff and generally disagreeable as ever, his eyes scanning the street for potential threats. As his eyes alight on you, you know you’re one of said threats.

Striding up to the man and blinking the rainwater from your eyes, you offer him a smile and wait for his verdict. His eyes take you in, scanning your person once, twice, before alighting on your face. Then, after a tense moment of waiting, he says the word you’ve been waiting for: “password?”

The phrase you speak is right, of course. You cough a little as you enter, your lungs protesting the heavy smoke permeating the air. It is the same group of Chicago nightlife you remember, lined wall-to-wall with the rich and the ragged and the reckless, of which all are now looking at you. Your neck heats up under their gaze as you walk to the bar, sitting down on a barstool before anyone can protest your arrival.

“What can I get you?” The bartender’s voice is tinged with disapproval.

“Whiskey,” you say simply, turning to the flapper dame who is currently batting her eyelashes at you.

The date is June 7th, 1925, and as the scent of gasoline hits your nostrils, you realize that you are gonna have a very long night.

Tread Softly is a mature roleplay set in Prohibition-Era Chicago. There’s going to be violence, sex, and lots and lots of drama, so if that appeals come on in! If not, however, we’ll be sad to see you go, but it’s for the best!

Home | Plot | Characters | Faceclaims | Rules 

6 months ago   •   10 notes   •   VIA milkovichhelps   •   SOURCE milkovichhelps
milkovichhelps:

"How Active is This Roleplay?" 

Disclaimer: As the header says this is a rant, which means you’re about to hear me complain about some shit you may or may not agree on. Does that mean you have the right to fill my inbox with hate? No, of course not. I am more than open to and even welcome a civilized discussion though.

Read More

milkovichhelps:

"How Active is This Roleplay?" 

Disclaimer: As the header says this is a rant, which means you’re about to hear me complain about some shit you may or may not agree on. Does that mean you have the right to fill my inbox with hate? No, of course not. I am more than open to and even welcome a civilized discussion though.

Read More

6 months ago   •   2,291 notes   •   VIA thewritingcafe   •   SOURCE writeworld

11 ESSENTIAL RULES OF GRAMMAR

writeworld:

from Suffolk County Community College

1. To join two independent clauses, use a comma followed by a conjunction, a semicolon alone, or a semicolon followed by a sentence modifier.

  • The delivery boy knew he carried strange cargo, but still ventured off unafraid.
  • The delivery boy knew he carried strange cargo, but he still ventured off unafraid.
  • My math teacher doesn’t know how to lecture, she should have remained a student.
  • My math teacher doesn’t know how to lecture; she should have remained a student.
  • Gregory has not changed physically; but has given himself an excuse to separate himself from the pain of previous experiences.
  • Gregory has not changed physically, but he has given himself an excuse to separate himself from the pain of previous experiences.

2. Use commas to bracket nonrestrictive phrases, which are not essential to the sentence’s meaning.

  • The bus driver with her ears tuned to the roar decided to take the grumbling bus on a detour across the football field.
  • The bus driver, her ears tuned to the roar, decided to take the grumbling bus on a detour across the football field.
  • My window as dirty as it is unleashes the beauty of nature on a snowy morning.
  • My window, as dirty as it is, unleashes the beauty of nature on a snowy morning.
  • King and Lucille, his customized black Gibsons have electrified audiences all over the world.
  • King and Lucille, his customized black Gibsons, have electrified audiences all over the world.

3. Do not use commas to bracket phrases that are essential to a sentence’s meaning.

  • The man, who has too many ties, has too few necks.
  • The man who has too many ties has too few necks.
  • The cats, with six toes, are a unique attraction of the tour of Hemingway’s house.
  • The cats with six toes are a unique attraction of the tour of Hemingway’s house.

4. When beginning a sentence with an introductory phrase, include a comma.

  • After buying the five pound jar of marshmallow spread he set off in search of a bulk portion of peanut butter.
  • After buying the five pound jar of marshmallow spread, he set off in search of a bulk portion of peanut butter.
  • With this he bestows the responsibility of his own happiness on his mother and father.
  • With this, he bestows the responsibility of his own happiness on his mother and father.
  • As she begins to gain independence it is natural for Greta to regard the idea of dependency as repugnant.
  • As she begins to gain independence, it is natural for Greta to regard the idea of dependency as repugnant.

5. To indicate possession, end a singular noun with an apostrophe followed by an ‘s’. Otherwise, the noun’s form seems plural.

  • Though the lobsters claws were bound, the creature made a threatening gesture as they dropped it in the pot.
  • Though thelobster’s claws were bound, the creature made a threatening gesture as they dropped it in the pot.
  • In a democracy, anyones vote counts as much as mine.
  • In a democracy, anyone’s vote counts as much as mine.
  • There is a vast age difference between Victors mother and father.
  • There is a vast age difference between Victor’s mother and father.

6. Use proper punctuation to integrate a quotation into a sentence. If the introductory material is an independent clause, add the quotation after a colon. If the introductory material ends in “thinks,” “saying,” or some other verb indicating expression, use a comma.

  • Tumbling down the hill, Jack yelled: “Damn, I’m sick of this.”
  • Tumbling down the hill, Jack yelled, ”Damn, I’m sick of this.”
  • Her letter spoke to him in harsh tones, “You never fail to repulse me.”
  • Her letter spoke to him in harshtones: ”You never fail to repulse me.”
  • He views the problem as a slight delay or a sickness that will eventually disappear, “how about going back to sleep for a few minutes and forgetting all this nonsense.”
  • He views the problem as a slight delay or a sickness that will eventually disappear: ”how about going back to sleep for a few minutes and forgetting all this nonsense.”

7. Make the subject and verb agree with each other, not with a word that comes between them.

  • The Thanksgiving dinner, right down to the beautiful centerpiece, were devoured by the escaped grizzly.
  • The Thanksgiving dinner, right down to the beautiful centerpiece, was devoured by the escaped grizzly.
  • The cart, as well as its contents, were gone.
  • The cart, as well as its contents, was gone.
  • The girl, along with her classmates, like the new teacher.
  • The girl, along with her classmates, likes the new teacher.

8. Be sure that a pronoun, a participial phrase, or an appositive refers clearly to the proper subject.

  • Its hump decorated in strings of flowers, the programmer rode the camel through the food court.
  • The programmer rode the camel, its hump decorated in strings of flowers, through the food court.
  • Filled with bad gas, he drove his car to Tucson despite the knocking.
  • Although it was filled with bad gas, he drove his car to Tucson despite the knocking.

9. Use parallel construction to make a strong point and create a smooth flow.

  • I was glad to be departing for Australia but I was nervous when I left my apartment.
  • I was glad to be departing for Australia but nervous to be leaving my apartment.
  • The system excels at tasks such as communicating with other computers, processing records, and mathematical calculations.
  • The system excels at tasks such as communicating with other computers, processing records, and calculating mathematical equations.

10. Use the active voice unless you specifically need to use the passive.

  • A refund was given to him by the hair regeneration company.
  • The hair regeneration company gave him a refund.
  • A good score was achieved by the team.
  • The team achieved a good score.
  • A box of chocolates and a dozen roses were presented to the girl by her boyfriend
  • The boyfriend presented a box of chocolates and a dozen roses to the girl.

11. Omit unnecessary words.

  • I would like to assert that the author should be considered to be a buffoon.
  • The author is a buffoon.
  • It would be safe to say that Gregory Samsa is not the only character in Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis to undergo drastic changes.
  • Gregory Samsa is not the only character in Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis to undergo drastic change.
  • Before going to the supermarket, we made a list of the groceries we needed in order to make the food that we intended to eat for dinner.
  • Before going to the supermarket, we made a list of groceries that we needed for dinner.
6 months ago   •   282 notes   •   VIA theme-hunter   •   SOURCE octomoosey
octomoosey:

The Broken Man [Theme 11]
live preview - download

Up to 7 custom links - hover on image
Sidebar image gif will resize to fit - 200px by 200px - it’s best if you can use a square image or one that size
Optional subtitle beneath description
Transparent posts (background colour/image)
Customisable colours, links & background
Background image aligned bottom right.

Sidebar gif and background made by me.Theme made for — knightinshiningimpala
Any glitches, or questions, hit up my ask. Thanks :3
Please don’t remove credit, a like or reblog would be appreciated!

octomoosey:

The Broken Man [Theme 11]

live preview - download

  • Up to 7 custom links - hover on image
  • Sidebar image gif will resize to fit - 200px by 200px - it’s best if you can use a square image or one that size
  • Optional subtitle beneath description
  • Transparent posts (background colour/image)
  • Customisable colours, links & background
  • Background image aligned bottom right.

Sidebar gif and background made by me.
Theme made for — knightinshiningimpala

Any glitches, or questions, hit up my ask. Thanks :3

Please don’t remove credit, a like or reblog would be appreciated!

6 months ago   •   104 notes   •   VIA theme-hunter   •   SOURCE cleverhelp

cl4p-tpwrites:

THEME 01 - SMILEY’S PEOPLE
↳ Live Preview: HERE // Download: Pastebin / Raw

Inspired by the aesthetics of the movie Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and the works of John le Carré and my first full theme released to the general public. The theme is simple, involving a double sidebar on the left and a basic post set up. The aesthetic benefits from two contrasting subtle patterns and the coloring of the page is very basic; one value influences the majority of the design. 

FEATURES 

  • Second sidebar navigation for standard links.
  • Optional Sidebar Image, nonlocal (url) or tumblr upload compatible. Select one. Automatically re-sized on upload. 
  • Title visible in sidebar.
  • Up to four custom links. Page links not supported.
  • Optional slide out update/notice bar; height chosen in theme values.
  • Option of two forms of credit — graphic (on the lower right) or link (on the far left navigation.)
  • Tags/source information visible on permalink page. 

Reset default values and refresh before customizing. Change anything you like, but keep credit intact. (Information on two ways to preserve credit are present in the code intro.) Please like or reblog if using!

6 months ago   •   572 notes   •   VIA theme-hunter   •   SOURCE themes-mandrakescry
themes-mandrakescry:

Theme 21: House of the rising sun by mandrakescry↳ live preview | code

5 custom links in the sidebar;
Title + subtitle;
Description;
Sidebar picture: 140x140px;
Border sidebar background: 130px, 100% tall;

DON’T remove the credit
Please LIKE/REBLOG if you use this.
ENJOY

themes-mandrakescry:

Theme 21: House of the rising sun by mandrakescry
live preview | code

  • 5 custom links in the sidebar;
  • Title + subtitle;
  • Description;
  • Sidebar picture: 140x140px;
  • Border sidebar background: 130px, 100% tall;
  • DON’T remove the credit
  • Please LIKE/REBLOG if you use this.
  • ENJOY
6 months ago   •   148 notes   •   VIA theme-hunter   •   SOURCE malfoymannor

malfoymannor:

theme #21  by malfoymannor!

live preview // code

  • 359/360px by 50px top image
  • five links
  • two titles
  • feel free to edit, keep credit intact and where it is.
  • if you have questions ask here!
  • like/reblog if you use :)
  • go here for my other themes.